News2019-05-20T18:42:42+02:00

The latest news from L2C!

Teachers on Shore!

Resources for your summer

This school year has come to an end!

Even democratic teachers need a break and over the next few weeks we will be doing just that.

It has been an exciting year so far with more blogs and booklets to come in the fall.

Whether you are getting a sun tan on the beach or enjoying some fresh mountain air away from it all, we cannot but stress how important it is for all educators to recharge their batteries, regain balance and take some tender loving care of themselves.

If this inspires you while you rest, then here is a selection of some of our most popular features to get you going for the new scholastic year!

Cards for Democracy for All

We have released the Cards for Democracy for All in 31 different languages!

Cards for Democracy are a set of 60 cards intended for all individuals, on their own and in groups.

Click here to learn more about them:

Learn more
Scenario 1 Cover: Exploring Through conversation

Scenarios Series

Scenarios are closely related to the Cards for Democracy

To help you use the Cards, we created some structures as examples.

We call such structures Scenarios because they are loose frameworks in which you can develop your creativity as an educator, facilitator, or trainer.

These Scenarios will help you find inspiration to create your own activities.

Learn more
Handbook for Teachers - Teaching European Values

Handbook for Teachers – Teaching European Values

We have long shared the Handbook for Teachers, a resource designed to give teachers a compact knowledge of the origins, functions, policies and strategies of the European Union.

The Handbook for Teachers includes activities that can be implemented in the classroom

Learn more

Educational toolkits to help fight gender stereotypes in school

We introduced the Educational Toolkits to help fight gender stereotypes in school.

The educational toolkits developed for the European Commission challenge learners in primary and secondary schools to identify and question gender stereotypes and discover career opportunities in the transport sector.

Learn more

We invite you to join Learn to Change!

By becoming a member you will benefit in many ways:

  • You join a group and become more powerful.

  • You support our common goals and empower yourself to change.

  • You join a community of committed people who want to change education and the way we learn.

  • You get regular resources for lessons, training and advocacy.

Become a member!

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VOICES FROM THE FIELD

Participants of the Summer School tell about their experience – Felicia Elena Boscodeala

The Learn 2 Change team would like to give space to the participants of the T4E Summer School in Malta to listen to their feedback and their impressions.

The T4E Academy for Democracy has been a 5-day educational experience whose program included courses, an open space and trips to the most evocative places of the beautiful island of Malta.

Felicia Elena Boscodeala’s Experience

On this article we share the words of Felicia Elena Boscodeala, professor of history at the University of Bucharest and enthusiastic participant in teacher education events!

Felicia attended the Teachers4Europe Academy “Setting an-Agora for a Democratic Culture” held in Malta in May and in this video she tells us the aspects that she most appreciated about this training.

Among these, she tells us how she appreciated the possibility of having met other colleagues from different countries and how this can be a great opportunity to exchange experiences and methodologies.

She also appreciated the participative and active sessions provided by the facilitators of the training.

Hear Felicia’s words for yourself:

See more from T4E Summer School

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VOICES FROM THE FIELD

Participants of the Summer School tell about their experience – Keno Dö

The Learn 2 Change team would like to give space to the participants of the T4E Summer School in Malta to listen to their feedback and their impressions.

The T4E Academy for Democracy has been a 5-day educational experience whose program included courses, an open space and trips to the most evocative places of the beautiful island of Malta.

Keno Dö’s Experience

What particularly impressed us about the Keno’s story is how he understood so deeply that inclusive education is not about teaching one hour of a topic or organizing a special day.

It’s about how we show up as educators every single minute of the school year.

Keno’s testimonial is not only about storytelling and sharing what is his experience from being a participant in a Learn 2 Change’s training within the Teachers4 Europe Erasmus+ Project, but most inspiring is such wisdom delivered by an early career teacher.

 

Hear the words of Keno for yourself:

See more from T4E Summer School

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SCENARIO 8

Conflict Resolution and Bias Reduction

A 60-card deck to reflect on our interior condition for democratic culture.

Learning to show up in the world of education with democratic values in mind

Cards for Democracy - Teachers' Edition

Content

  • Introduction to Scenario 8
  • Activity Example

    • Aim
    • Expected Outcome
    • Preparation
  • Procedure

How you show up in the world matters. This is why Cards for Democracy are an important tool today. They help us develop our interior condition to support democratic environment in our life and work.

Ready to use the Cards for Democracy? We offer some suggestions for you in the form of loose frameworks in which you can develop your creativity, as an educator, facilitator, or trainer.

These frameworks – we call them “Scenarios” – are intended to help you find inspiration to create your own activities.

L2C will share activities for download regularly in the C4D community of practice: Cards for Democracy Facebook group and on its media pages.

For an Introduction to the Cards for Democracy click here.

Scenario 8: Conflict Resolution and Bias Reduction

As we interact, we “run into trouble” at times.

Such situations can be experienced, in a growth mindset, as learning opportunities. That is if and when we create space for such learning to happen. The cards may be harnessed towards more complex interpersonal situations and contexts, to help protagonists understand and change the situation.

Incidents of conflict, othering, stereotyping and scapegoating can be mediated with the help of the Cards for Democracy.

Here is an example of such a context.

Teachers in Ukraine learning with Cards for Democracy

Teachers learning with the Cards for Democracy

Teachers in Ukraine learning with Cards for Democracy

Activity Example – Learning from Conflict with Cards for Democracy

Aim

  • To helps the protagonists of a crisis incident to resolve their conflict
  • To explore conflict as a matter of communication
  • To explore conflict as a resource for democratic education

Expected Outcome

  • Participants will engage together to resolve an interpersonal conflict
  • They will consider how much they, as individuals, can contribute to a more democratic environment*.

*the environment can be of many sorts: classroom, school, university, sports club, training…

Preparation

  • Make sure you have printed all the cards that you want to use (this may vary depending on what you have explored and how long you want this part of the session to last).
    The cards are available in the products section of Learn to Change.
    You can become a member by clicking here.

Context

This is a true story.

A 16 year old student, Käre, in the vocational college grade 11 used to joke around with one other student, Adri, of this class in such a way that he pretended to be hitting him in his private parts. That is, Käre made this sudden threatening movement but never actually touched Karl’s body.

Adri, more and more annoyed by this behavior, went to his friends and told them that he believed that Käre is gay. Then, during breaktime one of these friends, Raven, went to Käre and said to him: “I hear you’re gay and you like doing things to boys!”. Hearing this, Käre saw red and started a physical fight with the boys.

Other’s from the class intervened and stopped them from fighting.The incident then reported to a teacher.

Procedure

Step 1: Gather all the protagonists

Gather all the students that are involved in the incident and the bystanders.

Step 2: Gather testimonies

Take the protagonists one by one. Ask the involved students and the eyewitnesses and/or bystanders, to tell their own version of the story.

Step 3: Facilitate a dialogue

The point at which the conflict is an opportunity to learn can be supported by the use of the cards.

In the case of this incident describe above:

  • Gather three or four students:
    • the three boys involved;
    • a bystander who witnessed the incident;
  • Give each student two cards and invite them to reflect on these cards and start a conversation together with your support. Give students some time to read the cards and reflect on them and the incident. Then, in rounds give each the opportunity to speak about how they understand the card, how it might be linked to the incident, the behaviors of the people involved.

For example:

  • Käre who was ‘playfully attacking’ his classmate could be given the car
A3 Card for Democracy for All
  • Adri who got annoyed could be given the cards
S11 Cards for Democracy for All
  • Raven who attacked verbally could be give the cards
S18 Cards for Democracy for All
S20 Cards for Democracy for all
  • Bystanders
S20 Cards for Democracy for all

Step 4: Conclude with ‘future thinking’

Once all have spoken about their cards, lead the conversation towards more general perspectives:

  • What can we learn from this incident?
  • Have you discovered new paths to manage conflict? Explain.
  • How would you manage similar feelings the next time you experience them?

Step 5: Disbanding

Ask each student to choose a card to keep: this should be the card they feel they want to develop and progress on the most. You may then make an appointment with them in a couple of weeks to have a conversation on their inner development and how they feel today regarding that observable behavior (the card) they chose.

Important tip

In the conversation focus on behaviors more than the people: be mindful not to characterize students, but to stay on the level of their actions. Help students reflect on the cards they have.

Download the activity

Cards for Democracy - Teachers' Edition

By downloading Scenario 8 – Conflict Resolution and Bias Reduction, you will have a PDF resource to keep and consult for your activities.

Download Scenario 8

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SCENARIO 7

Personal development and personal learning goals

A 60-card deck to reflect on our interior condition for democratic culture.

Learning to show up in the world of education with democratic values in mind

Cards for Democracy - Teachers' Edition

Content

  • Introduction to Scenario 7
  • Activity Example

    • Aim
    • Expected Outcome
    • Preparation
  • Procedure

How you show up in the world matters. This is why Cards for Democracy are an important tool today. They help us develop our interior condition to support democratic environment in our life and work.

Ready to use the Cards for Democracy? We offer some suggestions for you in the form of loose frameworks in which you can develop your creativity, as an educator, facilitator, or trainer.

These frameworks – we call them “Scenarios” – are intended to help you find inspiration to create your own activities.

L2C will share activities for download regularly in the C4D community of practice: Cards for Democracy Facebook group and on its media pages.

For an Introduction to the Cards for Democracy click here.

Scenario 7: Personal development and personal learning goals

Trainers and teachers can use Cards for Democracy with learners to build a longitudinal documentation of learning progressions, through portfolios for example.

Teachers in Ukraine learning with Cards for Democracy

Teachers learning with the Cards for Democracy

Teachers in Ukraine learning with Cards for Democracy

Activity Example – Envision yourself as a grown-up

Aim

  • To reflect on the characteristics of the people that are important to me.
  • To point out what I desire to become in my life.
  • To realize that I can choose who I become.
  • To realize that I can take steps towards my future self.

Expected Outcome

  • Participants will have reflected on what person they would like to become.
  • Participants will be aware of the steps they can take towards their development.
  • Participants will be open to take responsibility for realizing their ideal.
  • Participants will consider how much they, as individuals, can contribute to a more democratic environment*.

*the environment can be of many sorts: classroom, school, university, sports club, training…

Preparation

Make sure you have printed all the cards that you want to use (this may vary depending on what you have explored and how long you want this part of the session to last).
The cards are available in the products section of Learn to Change.
You can become a member by clicking here.

Procedure

Step 1: Social activity

Divide a big group into small groups of 3-4 people. Have your students outline their hand on a sheet of paper. Have them answer individually one question for each finger.

  1. Thumb: Who was your favorite teacher in your experience of school ? Why?
  2. Index: Who is your favorite adult right now? Why?
  3. Middle finger: Which characteristics do you cherish in a friend?
  4. Ring finger: Which historical person would you like to meet? Why?
  5. Pinkie: Which is your favorite place in the world? Why?

Share your results with your micro group

Step 2: Envision yourself

Individually, envision yourself moving 10 years forward on a timeline: what kind of person have you become? Choose three of the cards above which best express your adulthood.

From where you stand, move towards the direction of your future self and put the cards on the ground: look back to your younger self and try to see which steps helped you to realize your future self.

Step 3: Exchange your experience

In pairs, exchange your experience of your walk to the “future”.

Step 4: Letter writing

Ask the participants to individually write a letter to their future self. Tell yourself which steps you are willing to take to reach your future self (20 min)

Have them seal the letters and collect them. suggest to participant to keep this letter, and open it in the future to evaluate how they have evolved, and to what extent they are moving in the direction they had wished.

Step 5: Debriefing

Possible questions for debriefing that we have found generative are:

  • What new thing have you learned about yourself?
  • How does thinking about your future self help you move towards your goal?
  • Do you believe you can reach your future self? What obstacles do you see as possible? What enablers would be helpful?

Step 6: Disbanding

Pick one card, within the selection below, that you would like to focus on for the next week.

Download the activity

Cards for Democracy - Teachers' Edition

By downloading Scenario 7 – Personal Development and Personal Learning Goals, you will have a PDF resource to keep and consult for your activities.

Download Scenario 7

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SCENARIO 6

Designing lessons and training sessions

A 60-card deck to reflect on our interior condition for democratic culture.

Learning to show up in the world of education with democratic values in mind

Cards for Democracy - Teachers' Edition

Content

  • Introduction to Scenario 6
  • Activity Example

    • Aim
    • Expected Outcome
    • Preparation
  • Procedure

How you show up in the world matters. This is why Cards for Democracy are an important tool today. They help us develop our interior condition to support democratic environment in our life and work.

Ready to use the Cards for Democracy? We offer some suggestions for you in the form of loose frameworks in which you can develop your creativity, as an educator, facilitator, or trainer.

These frameworks – we call them “Scenarios” – are intended to help you find inspiration to create your own activities.

L2C will share activities for download regularly in the C4D community of practice: Cards for Democracy Facebook group and on its media pages.

For an Introduction to the Cards for Democracy click here.

Scenario 6: Designing lessons and training sessions

“Communication is arguably the most important skill for a teacher.”

Prof. Dr. Jón Torfi Jónasson, keynote of the Pestalozzi Summer School 2015

You can use the Cards for Democracy as a starting point for your lesson design. When you, as a trainer or teacher, have a clear understanding of what you want for the group, you will be better able to communicate that clearly to learners. Cards for Democracy can help here to develop that clear understanding.

Using the cards will give you an opportunity to reflect upon:

  • Your own values
  • How you prioritize them
  • How to align your values with your behavior in the classroom

and thus help you be a convincing role model and “walking the talk”. The Cards for Democracy offer a flexible resource for exploring attitudes, values and actions in both, yourself and the individuals in your learning group. They help explore where your participants stand and what it will take to further their development.

In sum,

  • Having a clear vision at the onset will enable you to plan the right learning environment for your aims.
  • Having a clear vision at the outset will enable you to ask the right debriefing questions after the training activity.

Thus, learning about how we communicate, increases our attention and awareness about communication and invites us to explore what can be done to enhance our listening skills so as to avoid misunderstandings and also practice the ability to really connect to the people we communicate with.

Here is a suggestion for an activity that develops such aims.

Teachers in Ukraine learning with Cards for Democracy

Teachers learning with the Cards for Democracy

Teachers in Ukraine learning with Cards for Democracy

Activity Example – Listening for Democracy

Preparatory activity

Before you engage your participants in the activity, you may want to start wondering what it takes for communication to succeed. Perhaps you want to think back to a situation where communication failed, where you felt misunderstood, either because you failed to express yourself in a way that was easy to understand or because the other person was not listening. What would have helped to improve the situation? How easy or challenging is it for you to listen attentively to the people in your life?

Are you willing to commit to

    • improving your listening skills?
    • listen to people attentively?
    • always try to express your thoughts clearly?
    • ask questions more than to give answers?

Committing will set your subconscious towards these goals and put you on the fast track to developing these skills.

Aim

  • To become aware that there may be a difference between an interlocutors’ intent for a message and the interpretation of that message.
  • To become aware that active rephrasing and inquiring are integral parts of active listening
  • To empathize with your partner so as to take on your partner’s perspective and enhance mutual understanding

Expected Outcome

  • Participants will have experienced the difference between intent and interpretation of a message

  • Participants will have practiced rephrasing and inquiring to verify their understanding

  • Participants will practice expressing their thoughts clearly

  • Participants will reflect on reasons for misunderstandings and develop strategies to improve both listening and communication skills.

Preparation

  • Make sure you have printed all the cards that you want to use (this may vary depending on what you have explored and how long you want this part of the session to last).
    The cards are available in the products section of Learn to Change.
    You can become a member by clicking here.
  • Have a number of geometrical shapes (paper) in different colors and sizes ready that can be arranged so as to create different images that describe.
  • 3 images to draw
  • 3 sheets of paper and one pen per group

Procedure

Step 1: drawing

Create groups of 3 participants and ask them to choose their letter A, B, or C. Participants A and B are placed back to back. Participant A must describe an image that participant B will then draw on a paper. Participant C acts as a silent observer who does not intervene.

Step 2: Compare the two images

Participants describe which elements are similar and which are different. With the help of the observer, they talk about what misunderstandings were present, what strategies were helpful or not.

Step 3: Debriefing

  • Ask questions to find out about possible reasons why there is a difference between a message and the interpretation of that message?
  • Lead the conversation towards exploring what strategies can be used to minimize misunderstanding (such as empathizing, putting yourself in the shoes of the other, inquiring and rephrasing).

Step 4: Repeat step 1 and 2 with another image and swap the roles

This time: Participant A is the observer, Participant B describes the picture, Participant C draws the picture.

Participants describe which elements are similar and which are different. With the help of the observer, they talk about what misunderstandings were present, what strategies were helpful or not. They also compare if the result is closer to the original image than in the first round.

Step 5: Debriefing

  • Talk about the differences in the approach (attitude) of the person describing the picture as compared to the first round.
  • Talk about the differences in the behavior (skills) of the person drawing the picture as compared to the first round.
  • Explore: has awareness increased in the people in the second round? If so, to what effect?

Step 6: Repeat step 1 and 2 with another image and swap the roles

This time: Participant A is the observer, Participant B describes the picture, and participant C draws the picture.

Step 7: Debriefing

  • What have we learnt?
  • What changed in this round?
  • How can what was experienced in this activity be applied to everyday conversations?
  • What does the activity teach us about “giving instructions in the classroom”?
  • What is a good strategy to apply active listening in everyday life?
  • How can inquiry based communication help with deciphering between truth and lies, between information and propaganda, fake news or conspiracy theories?

Step 8: Disbanding

Explain that the aim of the session was to develop competences in the area of communication and especially around these components:

Download the activity

Cards for Democracy - Teachers' Edition

By downloading Scenario 6 – Designing lesson plans and training sessions, you will have a PDF resource to keep and consult for your activities.

Download Scenario 6

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SCENARIO 5

Evaluation and assessment

A 60-card deck to reflect on our interior condition for democratic culture.

Learning to show up in the world of education with democratic values in mind

Cards for Democracy - Teachers' Edition

Content

  • Introduction to Scenario 5
  • Activity Example

    • Aim2
    • Expected Outcome
    • Preparation
  • Procedure

How you show up in the world matters. This is why Cards for Democracy are an important tool today. They help us develop our interior condition to support democratic environment in our life and work.

Ready to use the Cards for Democracy? We offer some suggestions for you in the form of loose frameworks in which you can develop your creativity, as an educator, facilitator, or trainer.

These frameworks – we call them “Scenarios” – are intended to help you find inspiration to create your own activities.

L2C will share activities for download regularly in the C4D community of practice: Cards for Democracy Facebook group and on its media pages.

For an Introduction to the Cards for Democracy click here.

Scenario 5: Evaluation and assessment

Using the cards as learning outcomes, the cards can be used both

• For evaluation: by the teacher/facilitator for evaluation of the efficacy of their lesson/session: were the expected learning outcomes reached? How well did the activity help to develop learners’ competences?

• For assessment: they can be used by participants in the beginning of a course, a lesson or training session, for self and peer assessment activities. They help to assess “where I’m at” at the beginning of a course and then they can be used during or after the sequence to revisit “where I’m at” to tag progression and identify what is needed in order to develop further. They may also be used for goal setting by learners in the context of formative assessment.

Here is an example of such an activity.

Teachers in Ukraine learning with Cards for Democracy

Teachers learning with the Cards for Democracy

Teachers in Ukraine learning with Cards for Democracy

Activity Example – My Journey: Student’ Self-Assessment with Cards for Democracy

Aim

  • To assess students’ learning in terms of process and outcomes
  • To encourage self-assessment
  • To enable students to write an action plan for their own personal – and professional – growth
  • In the case of professional development, The Cards for Democracy – Teachers’ edition can be used, to help teachers develop competence for a democratic practice in education, through the development of attitudes, skills, and knowledge & understandings for democracy.

Expected Outcome

  • Participants will assess how much they, as individuals, can contribute to a more democratic environment*.
  • Participants will make plans for their learning and development.

    *the environment can be of many sorts: classroom, school, university, sports club, training…

Preparation

Make sure you have printed all the cards that you want to use (this may vary depending on what you have explored and how long you want this part of the session to last).
The cards are available in the products section of Learn to Change.

You can become a member by clicking here.

Prepare envelopes and A4 paper for the ‘letter to me’

Prepare the handouts for participants (see below). Make enough copies for handing out one A3 per participant.

Procedure

Step 1: At the beginning of a course

Ask students/participants to write a letter to themselves about the kind of person, or professional, they want to become.

They place their letters in an envelope. Collect the letters and keep them in your files.

You may also use a website that will send learners a personal email at the chosen date, for example: https://www.futureme.org.

Step 2: At the end of the course

Distribute the letters and A3 sheets of paper with three human silhouettes drawn on them (see below). Ask participants to read the letters they had written almost a year earlier and to collect keywords from the letter.

Invite them to write the keywords around or inside the first figure on the A3 paper (under “The beginning of my journey”).

They then evaluate their current status using the same keywords and some new ones. They place these around the second figure on the poster (“The status today”).

Finally, ask them to identify relevant keywords or statements and to place these around the third figure, representing the future (“What I want to become”)

Step 3: Action plan

Ask participants to distribute the Cards for Democracy amongst themselves and to select cards that could support their development as identified in the third figure.

Ask them to write the text from each card identified on the same A3 paper using a different color.

Invite participants to take turns to describe their journey and give arguments for the cards they had selected. To end, ask participants to create an action plan on how they can reach their desired aim to become the best person (or professional) they can be.

First, they draw their hand on the backside of the A3 sheet of paper and in the palm of the hand they write down their aim…

“My aim is to…”

Participants write five possible routes to their aim, one in each finger, and in the fingertips, they write the time it would take them to get there.

Step 4: Disbanding

Now, invite participants to share their ideas, either in pairs or trios, either taking turns in the whole group depending on the number of participants/students present.

It is particularly rewarding to use the cards and discuss the meaning behind the statements in depth and to see how learners engage in deep conversation about the content of the cards.

The cards make the assessment activity more meaningful.

Download the activity

Cards for Democracy - Teachers' Edition

By downloading Scenario 5 – Evaluation and assessment, you will have a PDF resource to keep and consult for your activities.

Download Scenario 5

THIS SCENARIO WAS WRITTEN BY

Pascale Mompoint Gaillard

Social psychologist/consultant, Co-founder of Learn to Change, who has worked in the area of intercultural communication, education and leadership training for the past 25 years, in Europe and the USA.

READ MORE ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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SCENARIO 4

Observation practices

A 60-card deck to reflect on our interior condition for democratic culture.

Learning to show up in the world of education with democratic values in mind

Cards for Democracy - Teachers' Edition

Content

  • Introduction to Scenario 4
  • Activity Example

    • Aim
    • Expected Outcome
    • Preparation
  • Procedure

How you show up in the world matters. This is why Cards for Democracy are an important tool today. They help us develop our interior condition to support democratic environment in our life and work.

Ready to use the Cards for Democracy? We offer some suggestions for you in the form of loose frameworks in which you can develop your creativity, as an educator, facilitator, or trainer.

These frameworks – we call them “Scenarios” – are intended to help you find inspiration to create your own activities.

L2C will share activities for download regularly in the C4D community of practice: Cards for Democracy Facebook group and on its media pages.

For an Introduction to the Cards for Democracy click here.

Scenario 4: Observation Practices

Observation is an effective tool to “diagnose” our and students’ learning gaps.

Carried out regularly, observation allows for gathering unexpected information (and data if done in the frame of action research).

Peer observation stimulates reflections about one’s own and others’ behaviors and elicits effective communication, the opportunity to be more observant and able to state our observations in interpersonal situations.

The cards below can inspire peers to observe themselves and each other, exchange about how they are practicing the cards in real-life, and/or how they see others practice and model these behaviors.

They then reflect on possible futures and ways to grow.

Here is an example of such an activity.

Activity Example – Mastering Observation

Aim

  • To relate observation to democratic behaviors
  • To understand conscious observation as a tool to deconstruct biassed interpretations of reality.
  • In the case of professional development, The Cards for Democracy – Teachers’ edition can be used, to help teachers develop competence for a democratic practice in education, through the development of attitudes, skills, and knowledge & understandings for democracy.

Expected Outcome

Participants will:

  • understand the potential of observation as a tool that promotes critical thinking and openness.
  • understand the merit of accurate descriptions to avoid biassed interpretations.
  • consider how much they, as individuals, can contribute to a more democratic environment*.

*the environment can be of many sorts: classroom, school, university, sports club, training…

Preparation

Make sure you have printed all the cards that you want to use (this may vary depending on what you have explored and how long you want this part of the session to last).

The cards are available in the products section of Learn to Change.

You can become a member by clicking here.

• Prepare a PPT presentation with the pictures and the 4 C4D below. Margritte’s picture can be downloaded from here.
The first 2 slides show the same painting. In the first one the caption is cut off and in the second the whole painting is shown, uncut (as shown below).

• Make sure you have enough space for all participants to feel comfortable and discuss in pairs (no special arrangements).

• Paper and pens to take notes during discussion are suggested.

• Flipchart or any kind of board.

Procedure

Step 1: What you see does not always mean what you get…

Project slide 1:

Ask participants What do you see? Round robin and very quickly

Project slide 2:

Allow time for participants to comprehend the difference of the 2 pictures. Inform participants that the author is René Magritte, and the painting was named The Treachery of Images (Ceci n’est pas une pipe), 1929. The painter highlights the gap between language and meaning.

Tell them: this is not a pipe; it is a painting of a pipe.

Step 2: Reflect and inquiry

Project the C4Ds below. Ask participants to pair and relate this card to their visual experience in step 1.

Each pair writes 2 findings.

Ask participants to share their findings. Write notes from the findings on the flipchart.

Step 3: Labelling

Introduce the concept of labelling and use the definition:

To label someone is to categorize someone into a particular stereotype without nuances. It can negatively affect them.

Project the C4D below. Ask participants to use the card below to explain the differences between describing and judging. Each pair writes 2 findings.

Ask participants to share their findings. Write the findings on the flipchart.

Step 4: Avoiding pitfalls and difficulties with observation

  • Explain: Observation as a tool for teaching and giving feedback is in part based on accurate description.
    Ask participants to pair and discuss how they define “accuracy”.
  • Explain: Accuracy in communication helps to avoid misunderstandings and conflict.
    There are Information, verbal and nonverbal messages, and they are understood by others differently. The way messages are recognized, comprehended, recalled, and interpreted depend on how they are perceived and transformed by the interlocutors. by the receiver.
  • Ask participants to discuss in pairs what are the pitfalls to be aware of when observing others. distribute some of these cards to prompt conversations. Participants write a list of pitfalls.

  • Circulate the lists among participants so that each gets acquainted with others’ results.

Tip: these are the key pitfalls that should be mentioned if not raised by participants:

  1. The introduction of biases in the process of observation, e.g., initial impressions may bias subsequent observations.
  2. All we perceive with our senses is filtered through layers of our personal point of view (bias).
  3. Quality observation uses written recording and does not rely on memory.
  4. Awareness and balancing of own attitudes of harshness and/or leniency facilitates useful observation.

Step 5: Debriefing

Possible questions for debriefing that we have found generative are:

  • Did you enjoy this activity? Why is that?
  • Show the findings written on the flipchart, read aloud some of them, and ask: do you think observation is part of your daily lives? In what ways?
  • What are the benefits of using observation as a tool? Give examples.
  • Observation plays a fundamental role in the improvement of teaching and learning: do you agree? Explain.
  • Can you explain how observation fosters democratic behaviors?

Step 6: Disbanding

Ask pairs to share one observation with one another : something, a behavior she/he/they displayed in the activity that was helpful for cooperation. They write it on a paper

“I observed you (NAME)… do (ACTION) and that was helpful”.

Before leaving the room they hand it to their peer.

Teachers in Ukraine learning with Cards for Democracy

Teachers learning with the Cards for Democracy

Teachers in Ukraine learning with Cards for Democracy

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Cards for Democracy - Teachers' Edition

By downloading Scenario 4 – Observation practices, you will have a PDF resource to keep and consult for your activities.

Download Scenario 4

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